Consultations

A listing of consultations involving Alberta Energy, active consultations are bolded;

2016 On March 16, 2016, Alberta announced the appointment of a coal phase-out facilitator to work with affected electricity generation owners. Alberta is acting on its commitment to transition to cleaner sources of electricity by replacing coal with renewable power and natural gas, for more information on coal in AlbertaPDF icon . A key part of this is appointing a facilitator to work with affected coal-fired electricity owners as we phase-out emissions and harmful pollutants from coal-fired generation by 2030, to review the scope of workPDF icon .

2015 Royalty Review, the review began in the summer of 2015, public submissions were closed on Devember 4, 2015. The reportPDF icon was released on January 29, 2016.

2014 Energy development in urban areas

2013 Fort McMurray Urban Development Sub-Region (UDSR)

2012 A Pipeline Safety Review was a task assigned to the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB). The ERCB awarded Group 10 Engineering Limited the contract, they delivered the report to the ERCB which became the Alberta Energy Regulator (AER) . The board reviewed the report and prepared a reportPDF icon for the Minister. On August 23, 2013 the Group 10 final reportPDF icon and Appendices 5MBPDF icon were released to the public and feedback was gathered. In March 2015, the Auditor General audited Alberta's pipeline safety and recommendations, then the AER respondedexternal link icon .

2011- 2013 Carbon Capture and Storage Regulatory Framework Assessment

2010 - 2013 Transmission related consultations including the Critical Transmission Review Committee and the Retail Market Review Committee

2010 Shell Quest a Carbon Capture and Storage project completed an Environmental Assessment.

2009 Stantec was commissioned to do a study of  current and future transmission technologies in the Electric Transmission Systems Study.

2009 Under the Electric Statutes Amendment Act, 2009 (also known as Bill 50), the Government of Alberta approved the need for four critical transmission infrastructure (CTI) projects. It also gave Cabinet the authority to designate future transmission facilities as critical transmission infrastructure. The Electric Utilities Amendment Act (also known as Bill 8) removes this authority and requires all future transmission infrastructure projects to go through a full needs assessment process before the Alberta Utilities Commission. The Government of Alberta no longer has the authority to approve the need for future critical transmission infrastructure. In the summer a number of electricity transmission information sessions were held around the province with the Alberta Electric System Operator.

In 2008 The Government appointed a Nuclear Power Expert Panel to prepare a report on nuclear energy. The Panel reportExternal link icon was released in March 2009, in April a nuclear power consultation involved;

  •  a workbookExternal link icon
  • open for public feedback
  • randomly enrolled discussion groups
  • stakeholder discussion groups and
  • a telephone survey. Participants included 4,832 individual Albertans and a broad range of stakeholder groups. Consultation results were compiled for the minister.

2006 - 2015 The Oil Sands Consultations Multi-stakeholder Committee (MSC) begins oil sands consultations throughout Alberta. This series of information meetings were held throughout the province to give Albertans an opportunity to add their voice into how the province's oil sands should be developed. The Oil Sands Consultations: Multi-stakeholder Committee final reportexternal link icon and the Oil Sands Consultations: Aboriginal consultation final reportexternal link icon were released in July 2007 then the Oil Sands Sustainable Development Secretariat (OSSDS) was created to address rapid growth issues in the oil sands regions of Alberta. The Secretariat collaborated with ministries, industry, communities and stakeholders to address the social, infrastructure, environmental and economic impacts of oil sands development their work ended in 2016.

2006 - 2008 Planning for regional land use began with Albertans asking for a broader land-use management plan. It moved to a series of consultations and then the creation of the Land Use Secretariatexternal link icon and the first Regional Advisory Councilsexternal link icon . The proclamation of the Alberta Land Stewardship Actexternal link icon made it possible to support regional plans. The Land-use Frameworkexternal link icon (LUF) was formed in 2008.

2007 The Government of Alberta tasks an independent, expert Royalty Review Panel to examine the province's energy royalties and tax regime. The panel was asked to focus on all aspects of the royalty system, including oil sands, conventional oil and gas, and coalbed methane. Their reportexternal link icon was released in September.

2005 Alberta’s Mineable Oil Sands Strategy (MOSS), was produced by a steering group that included representatives from environmental organizations, First Nations, industry and government. They were asked to revise plans for consulting on policy principles the draft for discussion documents, Mineable Oil Sands Strategy: for discussionexternal link icon and Mineable Oil Sands Integrated Resource final reportexternal link icon were submitted in October.

2003 Coalbed Methane/Natural Gas in Coal Multi-Stakeholder Advisory Committee (the MAC)